Monday, September 25, 2017

Claymore volume 1: Silver-eyed Slayer


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Today's post is on Claymore volume 1 by Norihiro Yagi. It is the first in the long running Claymore series. It is 187 pages long and is published by Shonen Jump Advanced. The cover is a close up of the main character Clare. The intended reader is someone who likes dark plots, high action, and strong female characters. There is mild foul language, no sex, and lots of violence in this book. The story is told from third person close of the main character. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- In a world where monsters called Yoma prey on humans and live among them in disguise, humanity's only hope is a new breed of warrior known as Claymores. Half human, hlaf monster, these silver-eyes slayers posses supernatural strength, but are condemned to fight their savage impulses or lose their humanity completely.
A village is gripped by fear and paranoia when a Yoma claims six lives. The Claymore who is send to slay the creature isn't what the villagers expect at all. In fact, she seems more monster than human.


Review- A good start to a series. The story starts with the villagers arguing about sending for a Claymore but as much as they fear the Claymores they fear the Yoma even more. Clare comes and she is a quiet warrior with no interest in anything more than her prey. The blurb does not give anything about the story. We get some world building with more than just the monsters. We get to see what happens when a Claymore loses the battle to control the monster within. The second main character is a young boy who Clare saves and wants to help her with saving others but as he is just a human the only thing that he can do is cook for her. I look forward to seeing where this series is going to go.

I give this volume a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this manga with my own money.

Friday, September 22, 2017

Lois Land: Fallout


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Today's post is on Lois Land: Fallout by Gwenda Bond. It is the first in her Lois Lane Trilogy. It is 303 pages long and is published by Switch Press. The cover has three section; the top has her name, the middle has an outline of her with the holoset on, and the bottom as the title of the volume. The intended reader is someone who likes Lois Lane, well written novels, and interesting plots. There is very mild foul language, no sex, and no violence in this book. The story is told from first person perspective of Lois. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- Army brat Lois Lane has moved more times than she can count- and has caused just as much trouble righting wrongs no one else seems to notice. Now that her family is in Metropolis for good, though, she's decided to fly straight. Unfortunately, it won't be that easy. A group known as the Warheads is tormenting a girl at school, messing with her mind via an immersive video game they all play. not cool. Armed with her wit and snazzy new job as a reported, Lois is determined to help. But this isn't just a case of cyberbullying- something seriously creepy and dangerous is going on. Thanks goodness she can always count her maybe-more-than-a-friend. a guy she knows only by his screen name, SmallvilleGuy...

Review- I loved this book so much but I love Lois Lane and I think that she does not get the love that she deserves. We join her as she is starting her life in Metropolis and she wants to get through the next two years without any trouble but on the first day she sees bullying and the principle not only does nothing, he tells that what the Warheads do is just fine with him. Well with her sense of justice outraged, Lois will stop at nothing to stop them. Clark is very much a background character. Lois does not even know his name, he is just a friend that she maybe has a little crush on who believes her when she asks the crazy questions. This novel is really about Lois starting to become the nosey reporter that we all know and love. I cannot wait to get my hands on the next volume.

I give this volume a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from my local library.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape


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Today’s post is on Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape by Jenna Miscavige Hill and Lisa Pulitzer.  It is 402 pages long and is published by HarperCollins. The cover is a picture of Hill as a young girl. The intended reader is someone who is interested in Scientology and the people who live in it. There is foul language, no sex, and mild violence in this book. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the dust jacket- Jenna Miscavige was raised to obey. As niece of the Church of Scientology's leader David Miscavige, she grew up at the center of this controversial organization. At 21, she made a break, risking everything she'd ever known and loved to leave Scientology once and for all. Now she speaks out about her life, the Church, her escape, going deep inside a religion that, for decades, has been the subject of fierce debate and speculation worldwide.
Piercing the veil of secrecy that has shrouded the world of Scientology, this insider reveals unprecedented firsthand knowledge of the religion, its rituals and its mysterious leader—David Miscavige. From her prolonged separation from her parents as a small child to being indoctrinated to serve the Church, from her lack of personal freedoms to the organization's emphasis on celebrity recruitment, Jenna goes behind the scenes of Scientology's oppressive and alienating culture, detailing an environment rooted in control in which the most devoted followers often face the harshest punishments when out of line. Detailing some of the Church's notorious practices, she also describes a childhood of isolation and neglect—a childhood that, painful as it was, prepared her for a tough life in the Church's most devoted order, the Sea Org.
Despite this hardship, it's only when her family approaches dissolution and her world begins to unravel that she's finally able to see the patterns of stifling conformity and psychological control that have ruled her life. Faced with a heartbreaking choice, she mounts a courageous escape, but not before being put thru the ultimate test of family, faith and love. Captivating and disturbing, Beyond Belief is an exploration of the limits of religion and the lengths to which some went to break free.

Review- This is Scientology from an insider was who a true believer and that makes this a heartbreaking but interesting read. Hill was a true believer and loved her religion, she wanted to make a difference with Scientology and its teachings but that is not what happened to her. Her parents were high up in the ranks and left her behind at the place called the Ranch and that is when I knew that it was going to be bad. It was not the worse escape book I have ever read but it was still very chilling at parts with Hill dealing with verbal abuse and people just not understanding that children are not mini-adults.  When she decided to leave it was a fight to get out with her husband but that is only the very last part of the book. The book is really about growing in Scientology and what that means. Having classes in Hubbard’s philosophy instead of normal subjects and thinking that the world outside was a sad and dangerous place makes for a very nervous child who is easily lead by those around her. It is impressive that Hill got out and got her husband out too.

I give this book a Four out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from my local library.

Monday, September 18, 2017

The Heiress and The Chauffeur volume 1


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Today's post is on The Heiress and The Chauffeur volume 1 by Keiko Ishihara. It is the first in a duology. It is 192 pages long and is published by Shojo Beat. The cover has the two main characters on it looking at the reader. The story is told from third person close of the two main characters moving one to the other as the story goes. The intended reader is someone who likes cute shojo stories, historical romance, and pretty art. There is no foul language, no sexuality, and very mild violence in this volume. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- At an all-girls school during the Taisho era in Japan, rumors swirl that heiress Sayaka Yoshimura is having a forbidden love affair with her chauffeur, Shinobu Narutaki! Sayaka scoffs at the rumors, but could a romance between master and servant actually be brewing?
Sayaka wears a crimson ribbon that signals she is at the top of her class, and her classmates all revere her. So when Narutaki ignores decorum and breaks school rules to protect Sayaka, will she stand by him or dismiss him as the school demands?


Review- This is a very cute story. Sayaka is a cute heroine and Shinobu is very sweet. They were friends as children and now they are young adults with all the expectations of that on them. The stories in this volume are mostly about Shinobu being seen as less than because he is servant and is from a poor background. Sayaka is very modern because she believes that people are not where they come from or how much money they have. So she gets into trouble with her opinions but she gets rescued by Shinobu a lot. But it is a very sweet, cute story and I look forward to the next volume with them.

I give this volume a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this manga with my own money. 

Friday, September 15, 2017

Down Among the Sticks and Bones


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Today's post is on Down Among the Sticks and Bones by Seanan McGuire. It is the second in her Wayward Children series but you do not have to have read the first novel to understand the story as this is a prequel to the first one. It is 187 pages long and is published by TOR Books. The intended reader is someone who likes horror fiction, fantastical places, and beautiful writing. There is no foul language, implied sex, and mild violence in this book. The story is told from first person god perspective. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the dust jacket- Twin sisters Jack and Jill were seventeen when they found their way home and were packed off to Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children.
This is the story of what happened first…
Jacqueline was her mother’s perfect daughter—polite and quiet, always dressed as a princess. If her mother was sometimes a little strict, it’s because crafting the perfect daughter takes discipline.
Jillian was her father’s perfect daughter—adventurous, thrill-seeking, and a bit of a tom-boy. He really would have preferred a son, but you work with what you've got.
They were five when they learned that grown-ups can’t be trusted.
They were twelve when they walked down the impossible staircase and discovered that the pretense of love can never be enough to prepare you a life filled with magic in a land filled with mad scientists and death and choices.
 

Review- I loved the first Wayward Children book and this one is no different. I loved seeing the world that Jack and Jill call home. I loved the ruby-red moon that hangs likes a judging eye, watching everything. McGuire pulls the reader back into the world(s) that children can find stairs in a truck of old clothes and disappear for five years. We follow Jack and Jill and see them like we are watching from the moon, unable to help or stop the end from racing towards them and us. I knew how the story ended but seeing for myself with them was very satisfying. I pitied Jill more in this book than in Every Heart a Doorway, and my heart ached more for Jack and what she truly lost when Jill pushed too far. But now we have their full story and I would love to see where they go from the ending of EHAD. I cannot wait for the next novella which is out in January 2018.

I give this novella a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this book with my own money.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All


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Today’s post is on is This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All by Marilyn Johnson. It is 272 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover is white with a librarian flying off the page like a superhero. The intended reader is someone interested in libraries and librarianship. There is no foul language, no sex, and no violence in this book. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the dust jacket- Buried in information? Cross-eyed over technology? From the bottom of a pile of paper and discs, books, e-books, and scattered thumb drives comes a cry of hope: Make way for the librarians! They want to help. They're not selling a thing. And librarians know best how to beat a path through the googolplex sources of information available to us, writes Marilyn Johnson, whose previous book, The Dead Beat, breathed merry life into the obituary-writing profession.This Book Is Overdue! is a romp through the ranks of information professionals and a revelation for readers burned out on the clich├ęs and stereotyping of librarians. Blunt and obscenely funny bloggers spill their stories in this book, as do a tattooed, hard-partying children's librarian; a fresh-scrubbed Catholic couple who teach missionaries to use computers; a blue-haired radical who uses her smartphone to help guide street protestors; a plethora of voluptuous avatars and cybrarians; the quiet, law-abiding librarians gagged by the FBI; and a boxing archivist. These are just a few of the visionaries Johnson captures here?pragmatic idealists who fuse the tools of the digital age with their love for the written word and the enduring values of free speech, open access, and scout-badge-quality assistance to anyone in need.Those who predicted the death of libraries forgot to consider that in the automated maze of contemporary life, none of us?neither the experts nor the hopelessly baffled?can get along without human help. And not just any help; we need librarians who won't charge us by the question or roll their eyes, no matter what we ask. Who are they? What do they know? And how quickly can they save us from being buried by the digital age?

Review- I admit that I am a librarian in my professional career and I have read Johnson’s two other books so I knew that I would enjoy this book and I was right. Johnson comes at this book as someone who loves libraries but does not understand how they work. So she wants to get it what makes a library a library, why someone would want to work at one, and what can they really do for a community. Johnson interviews some important librarians like the ones who stood against the government to protect the right to read and librarians who are making the technology of future libraries. But she also follows libraries into very different places like Second Life where reference services are available anytime day or night. Johnson does not cover much about the history of libraries but more about where they are going from here. Johnson pours all her passion into this subject and brings the reader with her into the heart of libraries. I have fun with this book and I look forward to Johnson’s next one.

I give this book a Four out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from my local library.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Deus Vitae volume 3

Today's post is on Deus Vitae volume 3 by Takuya Fujima. It is 24 pages long and was published by Tokyopop. It is the third in a trilogy. The cover has one of the minor female characters on it in a very sexual pose. The intended reader is adult, likes dark science fiction, and high action. There is foul language, sexuality, and violence in this book. The story is told from third person god perspective. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- After overcoming a perilous ambush, Ash and company meet up with the head office Re-o. There, Lemiu is confronted with a terrible secret from Ash's past... and a climactic attack of Selenoids could mean the end of mankind as we know it!

Review- So in this last volume we get some weird philosophy stuff about how the only thing that humans can offer Selenoids is love. So humankind is saved because of the love between Ash and Lemiu because in spite of the fact that Selenoids do not or can not love; somehow Lemiu can because reasons. Other than this series being very pretty to look at, it does not have much going to for. The story is very thin, characters are boring or just there to be sexualized, and just left me with nothing to write about in a positive way other than being pretty. But at least it was not a long series.

I give this volume a Two out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this manga with my money.