Monday, December 11, 2017

Codename: Sailor V volume 1


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Today's post is on Codename: Sailor V volume 1 by Naoko Takeuchi. It is 276 pages long and is published by Kodansha Comics. The cover has Sailor Venus in the center making a 'V' for victory sign at the reader. The intended reader is someone who likes classic manga and shojo manga. There is no foul language, no sex, and very mild violence it in this manga. The story is told from third person close of Minako. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- Like Sailor Moon, Minako Aino is a normal 13-year-old schoolgirl until a fateful day when a white cat introduces himself to her and tells her she has the power to transform into the hero, Sailor V. Using a magic pen to transform, Sailor V fights the evil agents of the Dark Agency as she strives to protect the earth.

Review- A fun beginning to a the Sailor Moon saga. I love(d) Sailor Moon as a teenager when it first came over to the US so it was fun to see where the storygot Takeuchi started . We even get to see some of the other Sailors in the background of  Minako's adventures. The main purpose of this volume, if not the second one as well, is setting up the world for the Sailor Moon saga. We get to see some of the bad guys and their world. We get to see Sailor Venus as she gets her super-hero feet under her and we get some of the mystery that is the heart of Sailor Moon. I had a every nice time with this volume and I am curious about how and where the prequel is going to end.

I give this volume Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for review and I bought this manga with my own money.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Mrs. Jeffries Dusts for Clues


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In today’s post is on Mrs. Jeffries Dusts for Clues by Emily Brightwell. It is the second her Mrs. Jeffries series. It is 184 pages long and is published by Berkley. The cover is green with the title in the title and a top hat on it. The intended reader is someone who read the first volume, likes cozy mysteries, and humorous plots. The story is told from third person close of the characters moving from one to the next over the course of the story. There is no foul language, no sex, and no violence in this book. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- A servant girl and a priceless brooch vanish at the same time, and it doesn't take a genius to put two and two together. The Inspector finds the brooch on a dead woman-but where's the missing servant? Fortunately, Mrs. Jeffries isn't one to give up on a case just because of a few loose ends . . .

Review- Another delightful mystery from Brightwell. The previous volume ended with Mrs. Luty Belle Crookshank asking Mrs. Jeffries to look for a young friend of hers that was missing. The police soon discover her clothes but not her or her shoes. From there we get another mystery from below stairs. With Mrs. Jeffries at the head and the other servants has her hands, she uncovers an interesting plot. The inspector is still as kind but a little thick-headed, the other servants are really starting to get their own personalities adding much to the story, and Mrs. Jeffries is as wonderful a character as the in the first one. I did guess the reason behind the murder but I still very much enjoyed the journey to the end. I look forward to the next volume which is going to have spiritualism and maybe even a ghost.

I give this novel a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from my local library.

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

1917: Vladimir Lenin, Woodrow Wilson, and the Year that Created the Modern Age

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I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review by Harper Collins. 

Today's Nonfiction post is on 1917: Vladimir Lenin, Woodrow Wilson, and the Year that Created the Modern Age by Arthur Herman. It is 448 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover has the eyes of the two leaders with the title below in red. The intended reader is someone interested in World War 1 history. There is some mild language, no sex, and talk of violence in this book. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- In 1917, Arthur Herman examines one crucial year and the two figures at its center who would set the course of modern world history: Woodrow Wilson and Vladimir Lenin. Though they were men of very different backgrounds and experiences, Herman reveals how Wilson and Lenin were very much alike. Both rose to supreme power, one through a democratic election; the other through violent revolution. Both transformed their countries by the policies they implemented, and the crucial decisions they made. Woodrow Wilson, a champion of democracy, capitalism, and the international order, steered America's involvement in World War I. Lenin, a communist revolutionary and advocate for the proletariat, lead the Bolsheviks' overthrow of Russia's earlier democratic revolution that toppled the Czar, and the establishment of a totalitarian Soviet Union. Men of opposing ideals and actions, each was idolized by millions-and vilified and feared by millions more. Though they would never meet, these two world leaders came to see in the other the evils of the world each sought to eradicate. In so doing, both would unleash the forces that still dominate our world, and that continue to shape its future from nationalism and Communism to today's maps of the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe. In this incisive, fast-paced history, Herman brilliantly explores the birth of a potent rivalry between two men who rewrote the rules of geopolitics-and the moment, one hundred years ago, when our contemporary world began.

Review- This is a very hard, dry read about a very interesting time in history. Herman does his research , which was excellent with notes about sources and other materials, but he forgot to make his book engaging. Reading this book was not easy. It was dry, it was overloaded with details that did not add to the overall narrative, and it was boring at times. Herman takes the reader from the begins of the First World War, briefly, then he get into the meat of his book which is how these two very different leaders shaped the war and the world after it. Herman gives so much information that I was lost at times about why one detail mattered so much in the sea of everything he deluged me with, sometimes I could not even tell which detail he wanted to make more important. In the end I was very disappointed with this book because it sounds so interesting but Herman loses the power of his reading of history in all the details of that history.

I give this book a Two out of Five stars.

Monday, December 4, 2017

Claymore volume 6: The Endless Gravestones


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Today's post is on Claymore volume 6: The Endless Gravestones by Norihiro Yagi. It is the sixth in the long running Claymore series, you need to have read the five volumes to understand the story. It is 189 pages long and is published by Shonen Jump Advanced. The cover has Clare fighting the Awakened Being from the last volume alone. The intended reader is someone who likes dark plots, high action, and strong female characters. There is mild foul language, no sexuality, and lots of violence in this book. The story is told from third person close of the main character. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- Clare and her fellow Claymores are nearing the end of their strength in their battle against the Awakened Being- a male ex-Claymore who can no longer control his Yoma powers. Not only is Clare the weakest among them, but she has taken the brunt of the creature's attacks as well, and yet she may be their only hope of discovering the Awakened Being's weakness.

Review- Like the past few volumes we have the ending of one plot and the beginning of another. The other Claymores that Clare was send with are very powerful, much more so than her, but the leader discovers Clare's true strength is that she can track Yoma energy. That is why she can fight Yoma so much more powerful than herself and win. It turns out they were send to die because they have been causing trouble and looking into things that the Organization does not want them to know. Clare is then sent to fight another Awakened Being but the real monster is the other Claymore. The other Claymore, Ophelia, is blood crazed and does not care for any life. She kills who she wants and if there are witnesses she kills them too. She discovers that Clare is half-Awakened and wants to kill her at all costs. That is where the volume ends. Ophelia is scarier than any other monster we have read about in the series so far and I do not think that Clare can win this fight without a high cost.

I give this volume a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this manga with my own money.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Whose Body


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Today’s post is on Whose Body by Dorothy L. Sayers. It is 212 pages long and is published by Harper Torch. It is the first in Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey series. The cover has the main character on it looking at a clue. The intended reader is someone who likes mysteries, classic mysteries, and interesting characters. There is no foul language, no sex, and no violence in this book. The story is told from the third person god perspective. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of the book- The stark naked body was lying in the tub. Not unusual for a proper bath, but highly irregular for murder -- especially with a pair of gold pince-nez deliberately perched before the sightless eyes. What's more, the face appeared to have been shaved after death. The police assumed that the victim was a prominent financier, but Lord Peter Wimsey, who dabbled in mystery detection as a hobby, knew better. In this, his first murder case, Lord Peter untangles the ghastly mystery of the corpse in the bath.

Review- A wonderful classic mystery made of great writing, interesting characters, and thrilling murders. Sayers gives the reader a treat in this book with a cunning murderer and a even more cunning detective. Lord Peter is funny, clever, and a good man who is trying to settle back into a world after the war but the World War 1 is not behind him but still in his mind and sometimes right in front of him. It is a subtle touch that makes this book feel set in the real world. I did not guess the villain until Lord Peter was alone with him and he was going to kill him but Lord Peter outsmarted him and saves the day. An excellent read and I look forward to more.

I give this book a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from my local library.

Monday, November 27, 2017

The Water Dragon's Bride volume 2


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Today's post is on The Water Dragon's Bride volume 2 by Rei Toma. It is the first in her Suijin no Hanayome series. It is 192 pages long and is published by Shojo Beat. The cover has two of the main characters on it looking at each other. The intended reader is someone who likes shojo and historical fantasy. There is no foul language, no sex, and violence in this book. The story is told from third person god with characters thoughts added in for character and plot development. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the back of book- After a ritual in the village leaves her hovering on the brink of death, Asahi is rescued by the power of the water dragon god! Has he awakened to feelings of compassion, or does Asahi need to flee this treacherous world before something even worse happens to her?

Review- The story picks up right the last volume left off with Asahi having been just healed by the Water Dragon God. Humans are not only confusing him but they are starting to anger him. So he summons a flood to destroy the humans that hurt her. In doing so he makes Asahi fear him even more. Her only friend Subaru is starting to hate the Water Dragon because of all the amoral things that he does. But the Water Dragon is starting to change because of his interactions with Asahi, Subaru, and even the other gods that are watching him and Asahi. The Water Dragon is not a good 'person' at the moment but the real problem is he has never interacted with humans or even really the other gods before. So he has so much to learn about how to not be scary to a human or even just not hated by one. The volume ends with a time skip and Asahi is at the youngest an older teenager maybe a young adult. So far a very sad manga with interesting characters and the plot is moving in an interesting way. I look forward to the next volume.

I give this volume Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this manga with my own money.

Friday, November 24, 2017

I Believe in a Thing Called Love


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Today's post is on I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maureen Goo. It is 325 pages long and is published by Farrar, Straus & Girous Inc. The cover is white with Desi in the center looking at the reader with a big smile on her face. The intended reader is someone who likes rom-com's, quirky-cute heroines, and sweet love stories. There is very mild foul language, no sex, and no violence in this book. The story is told from first person perspective of the main character. There Be Spoilers Ahead.

From the dust jacket- Desi Lee believes anything is possible if you have a plan. That’s how she became student body president. Varsity soccer star. And it’s how she’ll get into Stanford. But—she’s never had a boyfriend. In fact, she’s a disaster in romance, a clumsy, stammering humiliation magnet whose botched attempts at flirting have become legendary with her friends. So when the hottest human specimen to have ever lived walks into her life one day, Desi decides to tackle her flirting failures with the same zest she’s applied to everything else in her life. She finds guidance in the Korean dramas her father has been obsessively watching for years—where the hapless heroine always seems to end up in the arms of her true love by episode ten. It’s a simple formula, and Desi is a quick study. Armed with her “K Drama Steps to True Love,” Desi goes after the moody, elusive artist Luca Drakos—and boat rescues, love triangles, and staged car crashes ensue. But when the fun and games turn to true feels, Desi finds out that real love is about way more than just drama.

Review- I like K-dramas, they are so much fun, with cute stories and the characters are so over-the-top that you cannot help but love them for it. So when a K-drama inspired YA novel came across my desk I knew that I would have to read it ASAP. It is so cute that it hurts at times. Desi Lee has no luck with guys at all but of course then she meets Luca. Insert all the K-dramas that were the background music of her childhood and she has the most brilliant idea ever. Just follow the rules of the K-dramas heroines and in less than sixteen episodes get your true love. What follows is a cute love story with a heroine who will have True Love and the boy who does not know that he is True Love in a beanie. This book is funny, touching, and cutely romantic. If you like K-dramas or cute romances you need to read this book.

I give this book a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I borrowed this book from local library.